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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 8, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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nature unleashs devastation in the philippines a massive typhoon and one of the most powerful storms ever forces people to take shelter or flee. and secretary of state john kerry is going to georgia knnek -- geneva. thank you point a finger at israel and saying it's the first and only suspect in the plo leader's death. and a veteran battling ptsd finds a new way to defeat his personal demonds.
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♪ it is one of the most powerful storms ever recorded. and 12 million people in the philippines are right in its path. the brunt of super typhoon haiyan has been battering the pacific islands for hours and had winds of 195 miles per hour and gusts near 235 miles per hour. the typhoon which has the strength of a category 5 hurricane has killed three people and that number is expect to be much worse and good morning, i'm stephanie and to get an idea of the size it's more than 500 miles wide and that is an area roughly the distance between new york and charlotte and couldn't have come at a worst time, hundreds of thousands of philippines lost
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their homes in a powerful earthquake and the storm is not expect to hit the capitol of manila and it weakened a bit and let's bring in nicole to break down the storm. >> you were talking about the peak and 195 down to 165 miles per hour, which in our categories would still make this a category five storm but you see as it's making landfall from an organized and clearcut eye less organized right now. the actual hurricane force winds is 100 miles across and that is carving that area of damage but it's also all the water this was able to push up and in some cases about 20 feet is estimated. as we look at the storm over the next couple days, we are going to see it continue already today to move out of the philippines and so impacts will minimize as the days go on. this is made about because there are islands and five different
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islands as it has gone across and into the weekend it will head to vietnam. this is a storm right before, you can see the outline of the philippines here it hit. there is not aircraft usually in this area of the world. that is why it's hard to rank what storm is the strongest. we done actually have measurements but use the deborax scale and looking at the storm and organization level and you have a very clearcut eye and a circular eye and means it's not going under any sort of reorganization. it's a symmetrical storm and it maxs out the scale they use to estimate storms based on organization and this is the most intense storm that we possibly ever have seen at landfall. the old record was kamil, 190 miles per hour and that was on the gulf coast in 1969, but this storm i have to go back because there was recognizant in the
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measurement and piece together after the fact what weather data was able to survive as the storm came in and see if this does set a record for the strongest landfall. over the next couple days headed toward vietnam and it will make another impact there, still looking like it will be hurricane strength at that time and back to you. >> and al jazeera and craig is live from hong kong, who is being most effected by this monster storm? >> well, the storm as we just heard tracked across, made landfall on the east coast and flat ended two islands there completely and made its way 400 miles southwest of manila the capital but a city with 125 people have been evacuated and emergency services doing what they can to help those who have been stuck. the problem we have is that it cut all the telephone lines
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there. we have an al jazeera reporter down there. we lost communication with her. and the weather bureau as well from the philippines can't tell us exactly what is going on in the path of the storm because i also lost contact with their own stations down there. so we are in the dark a little bit at this stage and trying to find contact and get more information at this stage and we are told one person has died. there are to unconfirmed deaths on the outer islands. >> it's extraordinary we are able to get pictures out of the philippines and what can you tell us about the evacuations and preparations leading up to this? >> well, the philippines is the most typhoon ridden country on earth and gets 19 typhoons a year, this is the 24th serious storm to hit the country and being a set of islands and wind
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storms hitten and cause damage and you get the storm surge and this particular typhoon is expected to have storm surges of 5 meters and rain up to 16". when you get islands being hit by these size storm surges they wash away entire beaches and villages and that is the problem we have here. the philippines has been devastated by an earthquake a month ago, more than 100 people killed by that earthquake and this storm has actually tracked across the island at the epicenter of the earthquake and many people were this tents and living in rescue shelters that have been erected while towns were rebuilt and hit by a double whammy as far as natural disasters go. >> and hope they made it to evacuation centers and we are reporting from hong kong and thank you. joining us from manila the capitol of the philippines via
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skype and what is current assessment of how many people are effected and how devastating the storm has been? >> we don't have a clear picture on the damage. we have some information in from those areas where we have still communication lines up. so far i think we know that before the storm we had more than half a million people. we never equated to safe places. we don't have access to our people especially in the most western part of the country who was hit first this morning, the island of sanmar and latar and power and communication lines are down and we are trying to get in contact to our volunteers on the ground to collect information. >> reporter: i know you have staff on the ground in areas that are hit, it's hard to have communication with them at this
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point, what will their initial response entail? >> as i said, they have in the last few days been alerting people, trying to establish evacuation center so those people most in danger have been evacuated but on the other side you have to see this very remote area and a lot of islands around and difficult to reach these people and we are looking into life-saving activities and there are a lot of people who are injured because of flying objects and flying around and injuring people and surroundings of where the people are we are trying to do first aid and we have wide casualties we have to account for. >> reporter: the red cross in the philippines and thanks for joining us. experts say this storm is the
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most powerful ever to make landfall and they say it's stronger than a category five hurricane in the atlantic and would fall in the worst categories of tornado ef 5, in 69 hurricane kamile came up in mississippi with 190 mile and then we had one in guam and japan and killing 99 and allen ripped through the gulf of mexico causing $3 billion in damage. moving on to other news and secretary of state john kerry will arlive in geneva to joan negotiations with iran and they said a deal could be reached as early as today. iran wants relief from the economic sanctions that are crushing its economy. in return the 6 participating nations are asking iran to pull back on its nuclear program and
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president obama said he is not ready to eliminate international sanctions against iran. >> our job is not, not to trust but we need mechanisms to know what they are doing and not doing when it comes to their nuclear program and it's not about easing sanctions, the negotiations taking place are about how iran begins to meet its international obligations. >> reporter: and those talks are underway this geneva where we find phil, good morning to you, the foreign minister said a deal could be in the works or struck as early as today and john kerry and the french and british foreign secretary but what is under discussion today? >> well, what is under discussion we don't exactly know but we know some things that have been floated for example, a reduction in the enrichment
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program in the program, a cap on centerfuge in iran and open transparency on the iran side. floated on the western side perhaps reduction in sanctions and maybe opening up and unfreezing some foreign bank accounts and these are all things in the mix, precise wording of any kind of document is yet to be seen but the fact all the foreign ministers are coming into town and ramp up to a higher level means a deal may be in the offering. >> is benjamin netanyahu said an agreement would be a mistake of historic proportions and just delivered this blistering message to secretary of state john kerry. >> got everything and paid nothing, everything they wanted and wanted relief of sanctions after years of a grueling sanctions regime and got that and paying nothing because they
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are not reducing in any way the nuclear enrichment capability. so iran got the deal of the century. >> reporter: prime minister netanyahu acting more than skeptical and where does this put the u.s., israel's closest ally? >> stephanie the u.s. wants a deal. this has been a long-standing issue with iranians so there has been this strong drive to try and find something and the sanction programs have apparently worked to the extent that the americans say the iranians have for the first time really come to the table with honest intentions of making a deal. israel may not like it and hard liners in both iran and the united states that won't like it but again the options some u.s. hiring officials say is unthinkable and that would be further conflicts and perhaps leading to a military
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confrontation. >> president obama says he is in favor of modest sanctions relief until iran proves it can keep it's word to the community and what is iran hoping to walk away with after these negotiations? >> well, first and foremost you are right, they want an easing of sanctions. but even before these discussions began we had a background briefing with a very high member of the delegation here and that official told us that this would be a sick-month provisional period to ease up on some sanctions and concessions on iran but all reversible and that the core program of sanctions would not be touched and only some periphery of punitive actions that have taken place that would be implied and this would all be contingent on making sure that both see adhere to whatever agreement is reached here, if indeed there is one.
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>> the u.s. turning lightly and clearly and we are reporting from geneva. an unprecedented in britain and the session on thursday before the house of commons intelligence and security committee was televised and the spy chiefs were called in because of revelations from edward snowden and said they are operating within the law and insisted they are protecting britain's freedom and democracy. >> the leaks from snowden have been very damaging. they put our operations at risk. it's clear our adversaries are rubbing their hands with glee and al-qaeda is laughing. >> reporter: they say it disrupted 3 dozen terrorists plots since 2005. a new report says edward snowden got the passwords of nsa staffers to find the agency's secrets and a computer system
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administration -- administrator under contract with the agency and he was able to log in pretending to be up to two dozen other workers to obtain documents and the report said nsa employees had a spy base in hawaii and snowden said he needed the passwords to do his job. the fda declares war on trans fats and some americans are not happy about that and are telling the government to stay out of their snacks. big barges on the mississippi river, why they could hold the key to a huge economic boom and the promise of tens of thousands of high-paying new jobs. >> i am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. >> reporter: an apology says president obama is sorry for people losing his health insurance despite his repeated
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promises they would not. a look at the sun coming up, behind the capitol building in washington d.c. ♪ and to contact the centers and
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welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie and ahead 8 years after hurricane katrina louisiana is experiencing an economic boom and what is behind the growth creating tens of thousands of new jobs and first let's look at what temperatures we will see across the nation and nicole mitchell is back. >> one of the places we were feeling so warm, 50s and 60s in the northeast has gone away and when the front came through the temperatures dropped and washington d.c. we spent it in the 60s and now 37 degrees and pretty much 30s across the board. the clouds cleared out overnight and helps lower those temperatures in addition to the cooler air that came through behind the front. rest of the country, one of the cooler spots and minneapolis 25 and expected as we get in the month of november, the warm spot we will see is warm air out of
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the southwest ahead of the next system, mild air into parts of the plains and denver is in on that with a temperature of 68 degrees. speaking of the next weather system i will show you where it is and what it's bringing in a bit. >> thank you, president obama is scheduled to visit louisiana on saturday to talk about growing u.s. exports and it's a mayor turn around for the state's river ports and beyond and robert ray has more from reserve, louisiana. >> the bend twists from baton rouge and the gulf of mexico and around the world. >> super waterways. >> reporter: big barges feed the globe and oil and gas that powers it and cheap production costs are about to flow down the river and drive a bonanza and surge of jobs. >> an economic boom and what you
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have here is -- has not been witnessed in the united states. you have 80-100 billion in major investments. >> this is the port of south louisiana. and as the construction boom goes here, state and local officials say that it will create tens of thousands of jobs over the coming decades and bring in revenue like the state has never seen before. how much will these new jobs pay? >> 80, 80,000 or look at $120,000 a year. >> he runs the port and says the main reason for the expansion is low natural gas prices that the world wants now and with that comes a huge discount. >> because of the new and innovative way of tapping the natural gas reserves that we have running abundantly here in
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louisiana, the fracking. >> reporter: the world's producers like fertilizers, plastics and pharmaceuticals want in. >> we have south africa to new zeeland to germany coming to louisiana. >> reporter: with an expansion of this size there is caution, can the state attract enough skilled workers and how safe is the development in an already fragile echo system like the gulf of mexico. >> reporter: we have to make sure it's protected as well and not do things in a cavalier manner. >> reporter: in a state where energy is king money talks. >> major dollars and billions of dollars to develop and enhance and expand their industrial facilities. >> reporter: energy has always driven boom and bust cycles here, at issue will be the price, socially, politically and environmentally when the good times roll, robert ray, al jazeera reserve, louisiana.
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>> exports rose 3 1/2 percent this year compared to the same period in 2012 and amounts to $29 billion. here is what is making business news this morning twitter stole all of wall street's attention but the focus is on jobs and october employment report, the report is expected ob one of the weakest of the year. they are forecasting 125,000 nonfarm jobs were created. the unemployment rate is expected to rise to 7.4%. all that could mean the federal reserve will not cutback on the stimulus program at least any time soon and the report will be distorted by the 16-day government shut down. >> the u.s. data going forward will be extraordinarily skewed by the effect of the government shut down and the after effect there of. so there is a lot of adjustments being made and argument about what the appropriate adjustments should be but at the end of the day it will be very difficult to
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read those numbers probably until the release on the 1st of january. we will bring you the jobs report as soon as it's released at 8:30 eastern. ahead of the reports stock futures are higher and could see buying when the markets open and not the debut of twitter would raise it and twitter gained 73% in the first day of trading. dow fell and opens 15593 and the worst day since august and shed 1% and is 1747 and nasdaq is at 3957 and european stocks following the u.s. market and lower at this hour and traders reacting to news that standard and pores cut france credit rating and stocks tumbling ahead of the u.s. jobs reports and they all ended in the red.
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if you have been to a disney park recently you probably noticed long lines. consumers flocked to the parks this summer pushing quarterly profits higher than they earned a billion and a half dollars and monsters university also contributed to disney's strong summer. the mayo clinic calls trans fats double trouble for the heart and declared thursday they will be a thing of the past at least here in the u.s. here is more about trans foot and produced when hydrogen is added and doctors found it raises bad cholesterol levels and lower good cholesterol and can lead to clogged arteries and heart disease and several cities restricted use and fda is phasing them out nationwide and as john reports this will have a big impact on the traditional way of eating. >> reporter: lunchtime in
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downtown dallas and the food trucks are swamped. here you can make healthy or not so healthy choices. and mrs. johnson goes for healthy but avoiding trans fats is her choice and that choice should remain. >> it's a waste of time and waste of time and government money, it's a personal choice. >> reporter: it extends shelf life like pizza and microwave popcorn and used to improve texture and flavor and some have ban them and food makers have dropped them and food and drug administration said it's time to phase them out nationwide and fda calls this a life-saving proposition estimating the rules would prevent 20,000 heart attacks a year and 7,000 deaths a year from heart disease. scientists say trans fats are the worst kind of fat for your heart and increase bad cholesterol, raising your risk
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of heart disease. registered dietician megan doesn't see a ban as controversial at all. >> it can be replaced with other things and manufacturers have taken them out of the products and replaced them with something else and the products are not going away and they are still there and the cheetos and fritos and desert but there is a different attentive to the food that is safe for us. >> reporter: everyone we talked to, agreed trans fats are bad but felt there had to be better ways than new regulation to get them out of the diabetes. >> companies will stop using them as a result of people not buying products with trans fat. >> reporter: there is not a timetable for the trans fat phaseout and mark schneider, al jazeera dallas. >> new york was the first city in the u.s. to ban trans fats
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and on thursday bloomberg praised the decision, the prohibition on trans fats was a bold public health measure that faced criticism and got widespread acceptance and support and credit for taking the step which will help americans live longer and healthy lives. the pew research center shows that americans are divided over the trans fat band and found 44% of americans favor banning restaurants from using them in foods and 52% of americans oppose the idea. a blockbuster healthcare announcement and why significant health may soon be on the way for people seeking treatment for mental illness and addiction and people suffering from ptsd saying taking out aaggressions in the ring helped more than sitting on a couch. a meeting of top football powers and we will have that
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ahead in sports. ♪ actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is
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that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> they say they did it because they were trying to protect my children. they didn't protect my children, they traumatized them. >> fault lines examines why so many native american kids are caught in the child welfare system. >> any time they see a social worker its like seeing a police officer. the immediate response is, "they're here to take my kids". >> from the indian perspective who sees this in terms of history, this is as about as adversarial as it gets. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america.
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welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie si and the top story, a strongest storm recorded is endangering people ahead of haiyan and have winds of 195 miles per hour, that is more than a category five hurricane. palestinian officials are blaming israel for the death of yasser arafat, this is one day after an al jazeera investigation found the late palestinian leader may have been murdered using a deadly radio active poison and the people investigating the death calls it an assassination. a breakthrough deal on a nuclear program appears to be in the
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worst and john kerry has unexpectedly decided to join talks in geneva and will meet and make a statement on a deal to curb iran's nuclear program. and netanyahu issued a statement in geneva and warned if you broker a nuclear deal with iran count us out. >> this is a very bad deal. and israel utterly rejects it and what i'm saying is shared by many people if they express it publically and israel is not obliged by the argument and israel will do what it needs to do to defend itself and defend the security of its people. >> reporter: natalie.net made the statement after a tense meeting this morning with secretary of state john kerry and it was the third in barely 48 hours and more reaction to the warning and we are janed by
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mike hanna in jerusalem who is live and good morning to you. so you heard mr. netanyahu's comments today and after meeting with kerry he thinks a deal has already been reached. >> yes, indeed, the tun of his particular statement there is he knows what the deal is and doesn't like it a bit. the deal is on the table in geneva and discussed in the course of the day if netanyahu has inside information gleaned from the u.s. secretary of state that we simply don't know but we know that the israeli prime minister rejected any deal out of hand. >> that is not surprising to people who follow the issues but what does this do to an already strained relationship between the u.s. and israel? >> well, it has been a very difficult thing and john kerry came here on the surface to look
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at the negotiation process and the negotiators have been meeting for a period of time and still have six months within the timeline to reach some form of agreement but john kerry was unusual blunt for a u.s. politician in the region and in the past the statements were called unhelpful to the peace process and john kerry said they are illegitimate on the issue of iran and made quite clear the u.s. has its position and it will stick by it and in the negotiation process he was very clear his belief if israel does not accept this deal it could be facing a third thing and deeply angered the netanyahu government. sources within the government saying this is not helpful what they call a language of violence and threat. that is the context that john kerry has been talking about iran with benjamin netanyahu in and so certainly the discussions they have had and particularly the discussion that was held,
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arranged this morning before john kerry departed for geneva would have been stormy indeed. >> joining us to talk about what progress with iran could mean is mrs. cronburb and head of delegation and is in helsinki. i'm sure you heard mr. netanyahu's comments and does he have a right to be skeptical of any deal? >> i think he has his own analysis on the situation. and we know that israel is very opposed to any enrichment of uranian but they low not give up the right of enrichment so opposite positions which are difficult to reconcile. >> reporter: a lot of what is important in a deal is the
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verification process, isn't it? >> that's right. and i think that the deal will have to be very strict on verification. iranians will have to comply with all the requirements of the international atomic energy agency and they have to understand and ratify what is the protocol and even we are talking about maybe additional protocol plus verification and this will have to be very strict and i think the iran's know it. >> kerry is bringing weight to negotiations in geneva and what may derail the talks at this point? >> well, i understand that the talks that are going on now identify the first steps, maybe the measures for the first moves to come or six months so i think there are still the final
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details of the deal will be the important part. and but the first step is important and i think the positive atmosphere is already there. both have a will to find a compromise and also i think both presidents, both obama and president rouhani need this. >> they said yesterday that initial sanctions relief would be very modest. do you think it's enough for irans to sign off on a deal, very modest sanctions relief for a temporary deal as you describe? >> well, that is true but iranians for the first time been talking about and the west has been talking about the end result and i think the more substantial things will come in the next phases. the question is what is required of iran in this first phase. this is probably just reducing the enrichment of the uranium
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and they get minor sanctions relief and what is the sanctions relief and what are actually the requirements in the final phase. >> what would be the significance historically if iran and the u.s. were able to strike even a temporary agreement? >> well, i think it's of historical significance for the relations among between the two countries which have been there for decades and also it will be an improvement of the stability in the middle east and have a great impact on the stability of the middle east and the security of the middle east and finally i think that the iran case is important also for other cases of nuclear frustration where countries may aspire to the military dimension in nuclear
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technology and this also will be an important example of how to deal with it. >> reporter: all right, we are in helsinki, chairman of iran delegations and thank you so much for your insights this morning. only one more sight in syria must be checked for chemical weapons and an international team is inspecting and eliminating the country stockpile and used cameras to look at a facility in alepo and thought too dangerous to visit and say 21 sites had been neutralized as of last week but the u.s. says new intelligence indicates that syria's chemical weapons declaration may have been incomplete. fighting between rival factions leaves ten people wounded. clashes broke out in several sections of tripoli after a chief was killed and buildings were hit by gunfire and among them an radisson hotel where
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business travelers stay and they ended the dictator ship two years ago but since then they split up and the groups are accused of going deeper into instability and the country still has no constitution. muslim workers fired at a dhl site in kentucky are filing a complaint with the government and said they reversed the break time policy allowing muslims to pray which takes a few minutes and they were fired at the mail facility last month and say coworkers who are not muslims were given nonscheduled breaks to smoke and federal laws call for quote reasonable accommodation for workers to follow religious obligations. the senate takes a historic vote on gay rights. >> the bill as amended is passed. >> reporter: they voted 64-32 for a bill that would ban employers from discriminating against workers based on sexual orientation or gender identity
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and called the employment nondiscrimination act. >> when we say something is wrong and it shouldn't be done, that sends a powerful message to prevent discrimination in the first place. this is a really tremendous milestone. >> reporter: the measure won by partisan support in the senate but gay rights are bracing themselves for a fight in the house and they spoke with a woman who doesn't want to see anyone go through what she did. >> after six years of coaching soccer she found herself without a job after revealing she was a lesbian and expecting a child with her partner. >> i remember feeling like almost like you would when there is a death in the family, look being sad but being angry or being bitter. >> reporter: how had a winning record at bell mont-university in nashville and loved by
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players and she left in 2010 after telling its leaders about her sexual orientation. >> i was fearful, that was my career, that -- i grew up in college coaching. >> and we have to pray. >> reporter: her story gained national attention and led to a series of protests with students and high-profile donors accusing the private christian university of discrimination, the school said there was a mutual agreement for her. after weeks of criticism the university added sexual orientation to the nondiscrimination policy. and the house sees them passing the nondiscrimination act as a big step forward. >> and they have people depending on them to support them and just be evaluated based only on your talents and work ethic is important for any
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american. >> reporter: and she works at the glbt chamber of commerce and once a month she hears from people saying they lost their jobs because of sexual orientations and critics said it is not necessary or lead to frivolous lawsuits but she says it's needed now more than ever and points to states and companies who adopted them. >> they said it's good for business and good for the bottom line and states that have the protections in place and they have not seen any type of rise in lawsuits. and so i think we already have people paving the way and the rest of the country and congress are just catching up. >> reporter: and while passage of the bill and house of representatives may be a major hurdle the senate vote is a victory, jonathan martin al jazeera nashville. >> boehner thinks laws are adequate and feels it would hurt
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businesses and prompt lawsuits. americans coping with mental health issues and addiction can get more insurance coverage and they will have to cover mental healthcare and the new rules will say benefits are just as generous as those for medical and surgical treatments and insurers raised concerns that mental health treatments are sometimes lengthy but the administration said the rules will not significantly increase premiums because only a small percentage of patients require higher levels of care. it's been more than a month since health care.gov and he says the buck stops with him and issued an apology and republicans are not the only one asking for changes in the act and we have more. >> a day after talking about the signature health law. >> it was not working for too many people. >> reporter: an apology from president obama. >> i am sorry that they are
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finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. >> reporter: those assurances that americans would be able to keep their existing health plans should they choose to has not been the case for millions. >> it effects only a small amount of the population it means a lot to them when they get this letter cancelled and i am deeply concerned about it. >> reporter: it's not just the president who is concerned, but members of his own party. on wednesday he and vice president biden invited people to the white house to discuss the healthcare rollout that could effect the races and they asked them to extend the deadline for americans to sign up for insurance in the wake of the malfunctioning website and after the meeting tom issued a statement saying the two messages delivered to the white house are we have to make sure people are not punished for problems with healthcare.gov and
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gives every one time and a senate bill introduced by joe mansion and keshg and manson said we need to work together to fix the law and make it work so americans have access to affordable healthcare coverage and the by partisan bill covers $95 be delayed by one year in 2015 and the current law requires the individuals to sign up by march 31 of next year and the obamacare and the white house resisted changing. >> another bill was introduced this week by louisiana democrat senator mary landrow letting people keep their plans if they like them if premiums are up to date. and trouble for rob fort who days ago admitted to smoking crack, a video shows fort threatening to kill someone in a
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profanity-laced tirade. >> it will be over in five minutes. >> reporter: the 80-second long video was posted online by the toronto star and it paid for the video and fort offered another apology thursday and the second this week and admitted he was extremely drunk when it was recorded and won't say who was the target of his video rant. hard to beat that video. there were a couple of big bcs match-ups last night and john henry smith is here with sport. good morning. >> four football teams to beat rob fort. candidate marcus, check, undefeated record, check, uniforms, double check, third ranked oregon had it all in the thursday night show down at stanford and they had it last year too but to lose it to stanford. first quarter no score and up
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the middle for six and carried the ball 45 times and lost yardage twice and john liking it and retired the jersey at half time and quarterbacks doing it for himself and up the middle and stanford 14-0, the cardinal led 26-0 and cue the music and connects with a 23 yard score and oregon on the board and after they drove 29 yards to set up williamson for the field goal and oregon eats it up and picks it up and goes 65 yards for 6 and had a ball game. 26-13 after the failed two point try. fourth and goal for the ducks and marietta out of the bucket and finds brown and upset the ducks 26-20. another bcs top ten match up, 6th ranks bailer hosting oklahoma and bailer has the ball
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and keeps it the five-yard score and 10-5 leads. in the second bailer on the one and calls his own number and take a 12-point lead and final of the half and oklahoma looking to answer but bell is picked off by lackey and that would be costly on the ensuing drive. and looking for a good man finds antwan for 25 yard touch down and 8-0 beating oklahoma 41-12 and the second bears win over the sooners in 23 meetings. another day and another series of developments in the bullying scandal and alleged victim attorney cornwell said jonathan hasn't durationaled harassment that went far beyond hazing and he went on to say beyond the well publicized voicemail with the racial things he had an attack on him by a teammate and
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daily vulgar comments and rick smith said he suffered abuse from more than just incognito and a woman filed a police report for abuse on a golf court. they are hosting the trails by 4 and let's it fly and jordan read and redskins 17-14 and washington up and vikings have the ball and finds jonathan carlson and same score and roll out and go to the end zone and having the game of his professional life but comes up short and in obvious pain. ponder dislocates his left non-throwing shoulder and score on the next play to take the lead, 30 seconds left in the
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game, vikings up and can't get in bound and minnesota beats washington 34-27 and that is sports this morning. stephanie. >> thank you. some vets suffers from ptsd have a new out let for emotions. >> nothing will make you feel more alive than getting put through the ringer in here. >> reporter: some warn this therapy could do more harm than good. and fairly quiet weather as we start off the weekend but a system pulling out of the northwest could make for treacherous driving and show you where and tell you why. >> a live look at the new york city skyline this friday morning and it's a chilly one in the city. we will be right back.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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welcome back to al jazeera america, just ahead how those who fought for america and finding a new way to fight their
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post traumatic stress and let's see what precipitation we are looking at across the u.s. and metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> we are not seeing the wide band like yesterday across the east coast and the front cleared out. the next weather maker is pulling out of the northwest into the northern rockys and today starting to bring some rein to the northern plains, not too widespread but this is definitely going to be the problem spot so you can see all of this. the higher elevations and northern parts of rockys is areas of snow and some places 5,000 feet or higher could get 6" of snow and add into this system actually has a lot of wind with it. so the combination of snow and ice and wind is going to make some of those mountain passes very treacherous for driving and we have flow over the great lakes and see some lake effect moisture in the area. >> military vets are healing the
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stress of fighting by fighting, we visited a gym where they battle the mental scars of war. >> reporter: when steve is training and fighting he is so focused on mixed marital arts or mma that every other thought slips away including nearly drowning after a helicopter crash. >> the gym has really been like my peace. nothing will make you feel more alive then getting put through the ringer in here. >> reporter: the 31 year at vet has ptsd since 2002. the airman was in a helicopter patrolling the gulf. the pilot clipped the ship and it went 80 feet in the water. >> and i was drowning after that and i knew to get out and knew where the door was and knew the helicopter would flip over and bad shape and felt pain away. >> broke his back, leg and nose and haunted by the memory of
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watching a photo journal list on board drown and 11 years later he says he thinks about the crash every day but fighting and training in mma has been his therapy. >> there is a lot more you can get in here than sitting around in a circle and hugging a pillow. it's a positive environment similar to the military and around fighters and elite people and specialized groups and it's just part of being on a team and working towards a common goal. >> reporter: neurologist worked with injured vets and can see why they might fine a quote physical and emotional link with mma. >> they feel a lack of sense of control and mastering your skills in the ring and subdue another opponent gives you a sense of control and restores that sense of security. >> reporter: so far there is no scientific data backing up veteran's experiences and he
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says he is concerned about taking blows to the head which are unavoidable in mma. >> they are entering a sport with 30, 40% of the time they will sustain some kind of head injury, a light to severe concussion and i think that kind of damage might do more harm for a lot of these guys than help. >> reporter: he knows ptsd might be the most worst opponent he will face there one day at a time. >> reporter: but says he will continue using mma to concur it, al jazeera florida. >> ptsd is an overwhelming problem in the military and people commit suicide everyday and some worry about the safety of martial arts fighting they say they should use any therapy that helps them deal with pchl tsd. at the end of the first hour we are following the most powerful storm ever is slamming the philippines with 195 miles per
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hour winds and the typhoon covers 500 miles and john kerry is heading to geneva to join negotiations with iran but they are slamming a deal and saying it won't be bound by the agreement and president obama apologizes to americans who are losing their health insurance after he repeatedly promised that would not happen. >> i'm john henry smith and they may have issues with multiple dolphin players and the latest on the nfl scandal in south beach next hour. super typhoon may be the strongest landfalling storm on record when it hit the philippines and the latest and your national forecast. >> we continue and i'm back with you in 2 1/2 minutes.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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>> nature unleashes devastation in the philippines, a massive typhoon, one of the most powerful storms ever, forcing hundreds of thousands to flee and take shelter. >> i'm sorry that they are finding themselves in the situation based on assurances they got from me. >> an apology from the chief executive. president obama said he's sorry to americans who are losing their health insurance as he appears to unveil a new initiative on mental health. >> iran got the dealing of the century and the international community got a bad deal. >> israeli's prime minister
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criticizing a deal to end iran's nuclear program as secretary of state john kerry travels to seal the deal. >> one woman's 20 year quest to bring new life back to the businesses of detroit. ♪ theme >> good friday morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy. it is one of the most powerful storms ever recorded, battering the fill teens now. >> super typhoon haiyan hit the islands early today. winds reached 195 miles an hour when the storm came ashore. with peek gusts up to 235 miles an hour. >> weather experts say it is causing catastrophic damage, forcing millions into shelters. to get an idea of the size, it's more than 500 miles wide, an area roughly the same as the
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distance between new york and charlotte. >> the storm couldn't have come at a worse time. hundred was thousands lost their homes just a few weeks ago in a powerful earthquake. the storm is not expected to hit the capital city of manila, which is prone to heavy flooding. >> we go live to aljazeera's craig lease son, live from hong kong. good morning. who is most affected right now by this monster storm? >> well, as you mentioned, it reached landfall at 4:00 a.m. local time in the philippines, and cut a path across some of the smaller eastern islands before hitting some of the bigger islands, devastating everything in its path. as you mentioned, a massive, massive typhoon system, another one to hit the philippines, some 720,000 people have been evacuated, moved away from their homes. they're so used to the situation, particularly this
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year, they've got in very early and were able to move these people, we are getting reports now of four confirmed deaths, two from electrocution, one a falling tree, one a lightning strike. as that moves, it's now about 200 miles to the south of the philippines, and causing considerably more damage as it goes across. power and communications have been cut off. we've lost contact with our own aljazeera correspondent there, the local weather bureau has also lost contact with its stations within the region. we're only able to get reports as we're able to get through to manila, the capitol. >> many filipinos are still getting over an earthquake from three weeks ago. isn't the storm hitting those same areas? >> that's correct. it moved across at the epicenter
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of that earthquake that hit several weeks ago. more than a hundred people died in that earthquake, devastating entire village where a million people live, a big resort area, and caused a lot of damage to the tourism industry. many were forced to live in tents and rescue centers. they've been evacuated, so a double whammy for people in that area. they expect even more damage to come as a result as the storm moves across the island and heads into the south china sea. >> let's hope a lot of those people were able to evacuate. >> massive and positive storm, wind gusts of 235 miles an hour. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell with what we're looking at here. >> as it moves over land, its lost intensity, 165-mile an hour
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storm, what we would consider a category five. i stay estimated, because unlike when the storm hits the united when you've heard we talk about my military job with the hurricane hunters, we fly into the storms. in the united states, we have measurements of the storms. out here, that rarely happens. these are all satellite estimates, as this storm moved over the island, any weather equipment, it was so potent, it could have wiped that out. there may not actually be records of how strong the storm was. we'll have to see after the fact what survived to whether or not we can consider this the strongest landfall ever, because camille at 195 miles an hour was actually recorded. as it did this, definitely making a potent landfall. we had lot of communications wiped out, a storm surge of up oh to 20 feet in some areas. that wall of water was coming in. everything that has happened
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from this storm, we're just not getting the data back until people are able to get into these islands. this will continue its track to the west. here's how big and potent that storm was. as it continues westward, looks like vietnam within two days, another landfall there. back to you guys. >> thank you. joining us now from manila is bern shell with the international red cross. what is your current assessment of how many have been affected by this storm and how wide the devastation is? >> we are talking about at least five, 6 million people affected on the track of the storm. of course the intensity of the storm is different with its huge periphery. it's raining heavily in manila and we see some flooding here. the hardest hit area is the
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eastern part of the philippines where the storm hit this morning. also, we have lost contact to our people on the ground, the red cross volunteers and staff on the ground. we don't know exactly the situation. we hear it's massive destruction especially in those areas. we get reports in, even people can't go really out to do an assessment, because the trees are down, power lines are down, so it's very difficult to move around, and of course now we have night, so we have to wait to see the scope of the damage and fatalities. >> you were talking about the eastern parts of the philippines here. isn't that the poor effort section of the country? >> that is definitely the poorest part of the country. people live in small huts made out of wood and bamboo, and leaves, so of course, these houses, these huts cannot withstand the winds we have seen and been reported.
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of course we from experience, the result of typhoons, we have really to see massive destruction. we have to see that we need a lot of shelter to provide protection for all the people in the next days and weeks to come. >> it does look like long term assistance will be needed. thank you. we'll continue to follow this story here on aljazeera. >> meantime, americans coping with mental health issues and addiction will soon be able to get more insurance coverage. health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is expected to make that announcement this morning opinion the new rules extend benefits to rehab and outpatient services. insurers have raised concerns that mental health treatments are sometimes lengthy. the administration said the rules won't significantly increase premiums, because only a small percentage of patients require higher levels of care. we spoke recently to patrick kennedy about his personal struggles with mental health. the former senator has now become the spokesperson for expanded coverage. >> when you consider how important it is that your brain
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functions well for the rest of your body to function well, why wouldn't we make the necessary investments to help your brain function better? >> advocates say this is a victory for people who have mental health issues who for years have said it isn't equal to other coverage. >> the president has apologized to americans who are losing their current health insurance plans. while he was touting his health care plan he said no one would have to give up their policies if they liked their plans. millions are getting notices from insurance companies saying their plans are being canceled because they do not meet the new government standards. >> i am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. we've got to work hard to make sure that they know we hear them
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and that we're going to do everything we can to deal with folks who find themselves in a tough position as a consequence of this. >> two senators introducing a bill that would delay parts of the health care law. democrats want to push back the deadline for policy enrollment when the uninsured must sign up for insurance or face penalties. the deadline now is january 1. that bill would push that back by a year. >> gay right advocates are plotting a bill in congress. a bill was passed to protect lbgt employees from discrimination. there is no plan to bring up the measure for a vote. we will bring you more on the vote coming up in our next half hour. >> secretary of state john kerry will arrive to join the nuclear talks with iran. a deal could be reached as early as today.
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iran wants relief from the economic sanctions that are crushing its economy. in return, the six participating nations are asking iran to pull back on its nuclear program. president obama says he's not ready to drop international sanctions iran. >> our job is not to trust the eye raines, our job is to put in place mechanisms where we can verify what they're doing and not doing when it comes to their nuclear program, and the negotiations taking place are not about easing sanctions. the negotiations taking place are about how iran begins to meet its international obligations. >> once again, those talks are now underway in geneva. i want to brick in aljazeera's phil ittner. good morning to up, phil. iran's foreign minister say a deal could be in the works. secretary of state john kerry's coming in along with the french foreign minister and british foreign secretary. would this suggest a deal is imminent and what exactly is on
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the table here? >> well thomas, i think the fact that all these big hitters are coming into town does lead to the sense of optimism here on the ground in geneva that's been here basically since the start. what's on the table, we don't know exactly. a couple of things have been floated, on the iranian side they would give up part of their eye rain yum enrichment program. whether totally given up is unlikely, but lower it from 20%, close to a weapons grade. it's been floated the idea that they would be more transparent in what they're doing, and that there would be a cap on the centrifuges that are used. on the western side, there is an idea of an easing of sanctions. there's no talk of getting rid of all sanctions yet, there
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would be bank accounts held by high level iranian officials that might be unfrozen as they have been for a while now. all these things are in the mix. how they are all put together into a cohesive what is called first step in leading to a longer process is yet to be seen, but again, thomas, the fact that all these heavy hitters have come to town you does indicate they may be as close as they've ever come to some sort of agreement. >> in strong words israeli prime minister said it would be a mistake of historic proportions. he just delivered that blistering message to secretary of state john kerry. >> they got everything and paid nothing. everything they wanted. they wanted relief of sanctions after years of grueling sanctions regime. they got that. they're paying nothing, because they're not reducing in any way they're nuclear enrichment capability, so iran got the deal of the century. >> phil, where does this put the u.s., israeli's closest ally?
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>> the u.s. wants a deal. they have been driving hard for one. of course, israeli is not represented here, so they're not involved in these talks. obviously they're deeply concerned about a possible nuclear weapon held by tehran. america has repeatedly said there has to be some sort of negotiation and that while the military option is still on the table, it is by far the last resort that the american officials and dignitaries here want to see happen. they very much want to find some sort of negotiation to avoid any increase in the hostility and conflict between iran and the rest of the world. >> more to come out today. thank you. >> fighting between rival factions in libya leaves 10 people wounded.
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clashes broke out in tripoli after a militia chief was killed. a hotel was hit where travelers stay. there are smaller militias and some groups are accused of plunging libya deeper into instability. the country still has no constitution. >> last years attack on the compound in libya is in the spotlight again. a security officer hired to protect the compound now tells the f.b.i. that he was not at the site of the attack in 2012. this contradicts statements in a recently published book and cbs interview. sixty minutes is reviewing its reports on the benghazi attack. >> only one more site is left in syria that must be checked to be chemical weapons.
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an international team is inspecting and eliminating the countries stockpile. they used special cameras to survey its facility, one of two sites thought to be too dangerous to visit. 21 sites had been neutralized as of last week, but the u.s. says the declaration may have been incomplete. >> new fears that polio could spread to europe out of syria. polio cases in syria could endanger neighboring regions. symptoms include paralysis. it has the potential to spread widely to others without being noticed for at leaf a year. the united nations has been working to vaccinate more than 2 million children in syria and neighboring count irys. >> great britains parliament,
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public testimony by the intelligence agencies. they say they are operating within the law and insisted they are protecting britain's freedom and democracy. >> the leaks from snowden have been very damaging. they've put our operations at risk. it is clear that our adversaries are rubbing their hands with glee. al-qaeda is laughing it up. >> the agency chief said britains intelligence has disrupted nearly three dozen terrorist plots since 2005. >> a new report says edward snowden got pass words from staffers to uncover the spy agencies secrets. at the time, he was working in who way as a systems administrator under contract with the n.s.a. reuters said he used the log-ins of two dozen other workers to obtain documents. the report says some n.s.a. employees were identified, questioned and taken off
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assignments. snowden apparently told the workers he needed the pass words to do his job. that's quite a revelation. >> a new report from the administration on the government shutdown. >> wait until you hear the staggering amount paid to furloughed workers to do nothing. >> what some critics are saying about the 16 day shutdown and ripple effects of lost worker productivity. >> protesting what they call poverty wages, dozens of workers and supporters take to the streets to rally against wal-mart. >> unmasking a new superhero in america, a pakistani american brings a different perspective to marvel comics.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> good morning. you just saw that large number behind us totals $2 billion. in just a momentum, we'll tell you why federal workers were the recipients of all that money. >> first, let's look at what temperatures we can expect
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across the nation today. meteorologist nicole mitchell joining us once again. >> a brisk start to some places, others in for a mild day. across the country, minneapolis 25 this morning. i hope you're ok with this temperature, because this is going to look more like the highs next week. we're cooler this morning in the northeast after that front went through yesterday morning, 50's and 60's out the door, almost felt balmy, today in the 30's and 40's. if you're looking for one of the warmer spots in the country, well ahead of that next weather system, we actually have a flow out of the southwest, in the midsection of the country. that means denver today is going to be at 68, putting us 15 degrees above average in the central plains, and so pretty comfortable here. coming up, we'll take a closer look at that storm system. it is bringing more areas of rain and snow, that's just in a few minutes. >> changes ahead, meteorologist nicole mitchell, thank you.
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>> the president is throwing his weight behind a proposal to raise the countries minimum age. the white house is onboard with the fair wage minimum act, raising the minimum wage to $10.10 from $7.25. >> you can add an extra $2 billion to the growing tab from the partial government shutdown, according to a new report from the office of management and budget. it shows the government paid furloughed workers for 16 days to sit around and do nothing. they also lost $500 million in visitor spending at u.s. national parks. the white house says 850,000 federal employees were furloughed during the shutdown. >> hundred was wal-mart employees took to the streets thursday night protesting unfair wages and benefits. fifty workers were arrested after forcing a freeway running through china town to close.
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at one point. the group sat in a circle, refusing to move. >> time for headlines in business news this morning. today the focus is on jobs in the october unemployment report. the report is expected to be one of the weakest of the year. economists are forecasting only about 125,000 non-farm jobs were added. unemployment rate is expected to rise to 7.3%. analysts say the report will be distorted by the impact of the 16 day government shutdown. still, that could mean the federal reserve would not cut back on its stimulus program anytime soon. >> the employment situation in the united states is extraordinarily lackluster. we have a situation right now where for the most of this year, for nine months of this year, we saw enormous creation of very low wage jobs, jobs that pay an average of $15.80. >> we'll have the job numbers when they are released at 8:30 eastern and have coverage throughout the day. >> stock futures higher at this
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hour. we could see buying when the markets open. not even the splashy debut of twitter could raise the markets. it was a bright spot, gaining 73% from its i.p.o. in its first day of trading. it closed lower than its price at the opening bell. the dow jones falling 152 points. the s&p coming off its worst day since august, shedding 1%. the nasdaq taking a 2% hit. overseas, european stocks following the u.s. markets, mostly lower, traders reacting to news that standard & poor's cut francis credit rating. asia, stocks tumbling ahead of the u.s. jobs report, tokyo, hong kong and shanghai ending in the red. >> bowing issuing a warning to workers in the seattle area, it
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will consider moving production of its newest jet, the 77x if the union fails to ratify a new contract. the long term deal calls for pension and health care concessions. union leaders are opposed to the deal. >> there is big business in selling marijuana. twenty states have legalized medical marijuana and two recreational use, including washington state. we have more on the companies now trying to cash in on the business. >> throw a business and expo conference and they will come. 700 attendees here at $600 to $900 a head. no smoke be, please, this is serious business. >> these people are coming in from all walks of life and industries to take advantage of that and harness the power of the can bass industry. >> you didn't have any trouble selling out this conference. >> none whatsoever. >> 30 plus exhibitors have everything here. colorful packaging, can
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bass-based hair care products. seat to sale tracking software. liquid gold extract and the pipe of the future. >> this is your average battery that warms up the actual oil enough to go ahead and inhale and take a nice hit. >> this is a $64,000 unit, sounds like a lot of money. in a perfect situation, we've seen them pay for themselves in five days. >> that is a super critical fluid extractor for pulling those essential oils out of can bass. he can't keep up with demand. >> the super critical fluid extraction business is good. >> it's very good. >> you can talk to insurers, certified public accountants and bankers willing to bet on the business future of medical marijuana and legalized recreational pot. you can learn to grow your own, check out the best. >> we he serve a market of discreet adults who like to medicate for whatever reason, whether it be physical pain.
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>> with sparkling pomegranate soda? absolutely. it is one of our best-selling production. >> the airtight, odor tight, american made shrink herbal blend jars in different sizes. >> cool jars are trying to pioneer the ultimate stash. >> we can hold two popcorn seeds up to 32-ounces of liquid or powder or fluff. turn the key, turn the cap, you're into it. it's child resistant for under 21. >> it's an expo for the expanding world of legal weed and the buzz here is mostly about business. >> they get you wonderfully high. >> next year, the show plays vegas with an expected 2,000 people to attended. >> the new law will take effect in january. by next summer, more than 300 licensed marijuana stores will
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open doors throughout the state. >> a strong start for twitter as investors go bullish on the social networking website. >> with a value of more than $30 billion, is there room for investors. >> what some say about twitter's success. >> quality in the workplace, a bill banning discrimination against gay and transgender workers. >> the uganda military begins disarming the rebels. >> the miami dolphins scandal dominates nfl talk these days. coming you, i'll have the story of the chicago bears star who does his talking by dominating on the field. >> any time they see a social worker its like seeing a police officer. the immediate response is, "they're here to take my kids".
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>> from the indian perspective who sees this in terms of history, this is as about as adversarial as it gets. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites,
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hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america. >>, to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good friday morning to you,
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i'm thomas drayton. >> one of the strongest storms ever recorded has been pounding the philippines, endangering millions of people. more than 100,000 were evacuated ahead of super typhoon haiyan. the storm packing sustained winds of 195 miles per hour, stronger than a category five hurricane. >> a breakthrough deal on iran's nuclear program appears to be in the works. secretary of state john kerry has unexpectedly decided to join talks in geneva. he stopped in israeli where prime minister benjamin netanyahu said any deal with iran would be a mistake of heistics proportions. >> the storm is continuing to hit other nations. >> winds of 235 miles an hour at some points. we're going to have more on that in a moment with meteorologist nicole mitchell. along with tracking the storm, we're tracking twitter,
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yesterday up 70% from its initial i.p.o. offering. we're going to talk about whether it can sustain those stocks. >> i'm jealous of those twitter folks who are millionaires now. the u.s. senate approved a bill that basically protects gays in the workplace. we'll talk more about that later in the hour, too. >> john boehner saying that it is an unnecessary bill. >> we've heard of marvel, right? >> yeah. >> home to one of the most iconic characters is shaking up its roster with a new superhero with a background never before seen in its publications. >> investors are celebrating after a big day for twitter. its shares nearly doubled the initial prays the first day on the market. a couple of hours, the stock will trade again just below $45. it has been a warm welcome for a tech company that opened just seven years ago. >> it is worth now more than
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$25 billion. with a speed of a 140 character tweet, the micro blogging site is worth 22 times its projected sales. aljazeera was on wall street for this trending topic. >> if there's one thing twitter specializes in, it's creating a buzz. an expectation was high ahead of its first day of trading at the new york stock exchange. it goes by twtr on the ticker and began trading at more than $45 a share, well above the $26 set by the company as its offering price. it appears twitter learned a thing or two from the mistakes of facebook, that social networking site's initial public offering was marred by technical glitches at the nasdaq and trading that fell below expectations. it took more than a year for facebook shares to recover their initial value. >> first of all, it's the size of the number of shares issued and expectations of the velocity of the earnings. i don't want to get too
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involved, but the expectation is that twitter will arrive to a profitable position quickly. facebook opened and then traded lower, because they didn't think they were going to meet it. >> with celebrities and heads of state among twitters 230 million users, investors appear ready to take a chance on the micro blogging site. even if the company has yet to find a way to make money off its advertising. >> it got a very respective management team, guys that recognize you can't stay still and hold on to one product. you've got to change. you've got to innovate. you have to find partners to collaborate with, and i think that the investors are saying that all these things together combined make it an interesting investment, because it has potential going forward. >> twitter started the day up and never looked back. at the end of the trading day, its shares were under $45, making the estimated value of the company more than
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$30 billion. not bad for a company that's neve posted a profit. aljazeera, at the new york stock exchange. >> twitter is the latest of more than a dozen internet companies that have gone public in the past few years including group on, zinga and yeple. >> with the stocks soaring more than 70% in its debut, i want to bring in a guest. good morning to you. >> good morning, thomas. >> this is mind blowing, a company worth $37.1 billion that didn't exist seven years ago. >> yesterday, you're having old wall street embrace the new economy. that was really the right place to list that stock. it's the largest equity market in the world and we got the i.p.o. up and running. >> shares were offered at $26, it closed over $40 a share.
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was the price too low? >> that will be the debate for weeks the come. when companies do the road shows and go out and solicit interest from the institutional investors on the initial offering, they try to get to a price level. it's never perfect. what you don't want is to bring the company public and all of a sudden they trade down for the day. if people want to complain about the stock trading up 70% from its i.p.o. price, they will complain about it, but i this i it was the best of all. >> it seems to be a remarkable level of investor confidence here. >> twitter is the next frontier for how we will communicate. it has become an indispensable companion for people's life experiences on a daily basis. the ability for twitter to upon ties, they will be able to mine the data they are able to get out of the system.
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>> they have yet to post a profit. >> that's very typical for emerging technology companies. what they will do and what they have said they will do is pretty soon be posting profits. you invest for future earnings and growth. >> who's going to be making the money here. it's not the common investor who bought stocks over $40. it's creating billionaires. >> not only do the owners cash out, they still own some of the company. the clients got the stock at $26, flipped it back out at $45 when the stock opened. they made a nice hand some profit yesterday. >> not a bad flip. will this sustain? >> ho knows. most of the social media companies that have come out and traded down in a few weeks after coming out as an initial offering, i think twitter will probably sustain and move up
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because of the popularity. also, we're getting into the end of the year where people will probably be buying twitter shares for christmas gusts. >> i'd love to get that for a christmas gift. how would you compare this with facebook's offering? >> facebook came out on the nasdaq and well publicize technical glitches. we take the nice elegant marriage of technology with the experience and you're able to bring out a public offering in a greater fashion, get a little more clarity, a little more methodical fashion and arrive at the right price to brin bring i. if there were any technical glitches, which there weren't, the humans are there to keep it operating. >> good to have you with us this morning. >> thanks very much. >> brazil has given google until tomorrow to turn over private
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data collected through google maps, claiming google's street view was able to access private wi-fi networks and gather personal information. if google refuses, it could face a daily fine of between $15,000 and $500,000. rebel fighters have surrendered in uganda according to officials. about 1500 fighters in the top commander of the group m23 handed over weapons. the rebel group is giving up after 20 months of conflict. the congolese army was backed by the u.n. and rapidly advancing on those rebels. >> gay rights are watching a bill in congress protecting lbgt employees from work discrimination. the battle is far from over. >> after years of opposition, it was a major victory for
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supporters of gay rights. while the bill passed by a comfortable margin in the senate, a brick wall looms in the house. >> supporters call it an historic moment. >> the bill as amended is passed. >> the senate easily passing the employment non-discrimination act. it would bar discrimination in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. >> let the bells of freedom ring. >> it was of a string of victories for the gay rights movement. >> this is a really tremendous milestone, a day i will never forget in my service in the senate. >> every democratic voled yes, and they were joined by 10 republicans, no of them among the chamber's most conservative. that's a new political dynamic and reflection of changing public attitudes.
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a pol asked should tuesday change. that was six years ago, when just 49% agreed. social conservatives oppose the measure. the issue exposes another fracture in the republican party. in a state, the family reserve council says it would transform the workplace into an environment in which certain conduct must be given special privileges by employers and in which any moral or religious expression in opposition would be suppressed. the bill includes a broad exemption for religious organizations, schools and churches. caught no in the middle, house speaker john boehner who says he is against it ocean it will lead to more lawsuits and hurt small businesses. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> until boehner changes course, the white house and democrats will keep the pressure on. >> some of the objections that i've heard from members in the house are reminiscent of objections that opponents of
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other civil rights legislation put forward. they were wrong then and they're wrong now. this is the right thing to do. >> in a statement, president obama praised the senate, while blasting house republicans for standing in the way of what he calls historic legislation. mike viqueira, aljazeera, the white house. >> here's how many americans would be protected under this bill. about three and a half% of americans identify themselves as lbgt. slightly more than half workers have disclosed their sexuality on the job. >> another day, another twist in the miami dolphins hazing scandal. john henry smith joining us now. >> alleged bullying victim john martin's statement said jonathan endured harassments that went far beyond the additional locker room hazing.
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he went on to say beyond the well publicized voice mail, he endured a malicious physical attack on him by a teammate and daily vulgar comments. thursday, his agent said his client suffered abuse from multiple dolphins, not just rickey incognito. >> one guy you neve hear with scandal is chicago bear matt forte. despite being one of the top five running backs, you don't hear much about matt forte at all. that's about to change at all. >> he's the do everything running back for the chicago bears. still there's a few things matt forte doesn't do. for one thing, he doesn't do flashy. >> some people, once they are flashy and promote themselves, they get more recognized by the world. i always stick by what the bible says, be in the world but not of the world. >> another thing he doesn't do is get in trouble you,
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particularly about drinking and driving, why do you think that you've been ail to keep your nose clean when so many other players have not. >> first of all, i don't drink like that. my father and mother instilled discipline in me and my brother. >> matt followed in dad's footsteps, but matt forte long dreamed of doing his father one better. >> growing up when i was seven years old and first started playing, i told my dad i'm going to play professional football. he looked at me crazy. i've had that drive and determination to make it, and i put in the work to do that, so i can't believe i'm already in my sixth year of playing. >> all the hard work has put him in position to pass kneel anderson this season for second place on the bears all time rushing list. >> it will be a great achievement to move hope ohfully, and get those yards and move past neil anderson, who was
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a agree back. >> of course the running back all bears are measured against is the late great walter payton. >> he made a lot of yards and touchdowns and stuff. it's hard to compare yourself among a guy like walt are payton, but, you know, it's a cool thing to be out here and playing for the city he played for, the team he played for, and, you know, the same position as well, so you've got a lot to live up to. >> he lived with quite a bit of uncertainty in 2011 when he thought he should be paid among the best running backs in the game and the bears didn't. >> instead of holding out in training camp as so many others have done with, forté gambled that he could hold up as he demonstrated his value in the final year of his contract. >> you seem to have everybody rooting for you. is it true that at the bottom of piles out there on the field, opponents were asking you hey, man, did you get the money yet? they were rooting for you. >> it did happen a couple of times, guys saying keep playing
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hard, reassured me i was doing the right thing by not really out there, you know, going crazy in the media and talking about it, and just, you know, playing good football. >> on july 16, 2012, forté and the bears agreed on a four year, $32 million deal. forté has caught his big money deal, but with walter payton's rushing record still over 10,000 yards away, catching sweetness will be a tougher task, but not an impossible one, forté says, with new coach marc trestman running the show. >> the skies the limit, especially in this offense with coach forest man. you know, there's a lot of room for me to do big things like that. >> the bears have announced forté will have his quarterback john kerry in the lineup sunday against the lions in a battle for first place in the nfc north. that's sports, back to you, stephanie and thomas. >> thank you. >> the comic book publishing
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giant behind spiderman, the hulk and captain america is bringing back another superhero, miss marvel. >> woo-hoo! >> the new hero is a muslim teenager from new jersey. we have more. >> comic book heroes are typically white men. marvel comics editor is helping to change that. >> i grew up as a muslim and pakistani. it's really about just being a young girl and maneuvering the pathways to adulthood. >> meet the new miss marvel. >> the bracelet says her name in arabic. >> she's known as a 16-year-old with the power to change shape. she's a pakistani american and she's muslim. >> the reality is that we don't have as many strong female leads as we should. we don't have as many diverse characters in the media.
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>> the new character will live in one of the countries most diversities, jersey city, new jersey. at the city's only comic bookstore, manager herbert jackson said the new superhero sounds cool. >> bunk muslim is a huge step. there's not that many muslim super heroes and there are no muslim teenage superheros out there. >> in comic book history, things that seem novel at first become normal. wonder woman made her debut in a male superhero dominated world. since then, she has become an icon. >> gay and lesbian super heroes have been created. miss muslithis superhero is thet female muslim superhero.
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>> it's an opportunity for people of other races, other religions to finally get a new spotlight. >> those are the messages miss marvel's creators hope the new comic book will bring. >> the world isn't one face, one label, one identity. it's different versions of that. it is trying to embrace all of those identities at the same time. >> diverse comic book characters haven't always sold well. marvel comics hopes the buzz will turn that around. aljazeera, new york. >> marvel comics plan to say launch the series featuring the muslim superhero in february. it's so great to be able to identify with the characters. >> i'm certainly going to buy that comic book. >> profiting from identity theft. >> the i.r.s. says people are using stolen identities to cash in on tax refunds. >> that's tallying up to a
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multi-million dollars heist of taxpayer money. >> i see something with momentum. it's great to see. >> jump starting the motor city, the push that's been underway for two decades to help revitalize detroit.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> up next, we continue our week long series, champions of the economy with a look at one woman who's been working 20 years to bring detroit back. >> first, let's get a look at what potential precipitation we are looking at across the u.s. today. nicole. >> relatively, not too eventful out there. we have the front that moved off the coast, brought rain with it. that has moved out. we're watching the next weather system and a few showers in texas. as we get to the bigger system, now this is bringing rain to the northern plains, but enough of this energy still in the northern rockies that we're going to be looking at snow, in some cases, higher elevations could be up to six inches. this is a windy system.
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those wind gusts could be 40-sick miles an hour. if you're driving, that's going to be treacherous along with icy conditions in the mountain passes. as we continue across the country, midsection, a couple showers moving it. we also have this pattern that's bringing us a little lake effect. wave for that potential. >> thieves collected $4 billion in fraudulent tax refunds. that's according to a new report by the treasury department inspector general. the identities of 4.5 million people were stolen. >> the final arguments for detroit's federal trial start this morning. the court must decide if detroit may file for bankruptcy protection. the city made an $18 billion bankruptcy filing in july. closing arguments could last all day. >> all week in our special series, champions of the economy, we've focused on in voluntary native ways people are finding to deal with tough economic times.
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today we go to motor city's mid town area, a bright spot in a struggling city on the brink of bankruptcy. we are introduced to a woman helping to fuel a comeback in the motor city. >> located just north of downtown detroit is an area that in the past five years has become known as mid town, detroit's cultural center, a combination of art, music abhigher education and new business in a city on the verge of bankruptcy. mid town is a hip urban neighborhood on the rebound, but it hasn't always been this way. >> there's many like me in this neighborhood that have always seen potential here. >> for over 20 years, susan, some calling her the mayor of mid town has run an agency solely focused on revitalizing this community. she and her team helped seal the deal on dozens of multi-million
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dollars housing projects, including this whole foods, which opened its first detroit supermarket in mid town this past june. >> every week, we probably get five to 10 calls from very serious retailers, restaurant owners, housing investors. >> the client is very artistic, students, professionals. >> she helped him through the process of opening this coffee shop, which is thriving today. >> it's important for us to be in mid town, you know, mainly because of sue's influence and the vision she had for this block. >> we're reclaiming the rain water to flush our toilets. >> when scott lowell saw potential for mid town years ago, he also turned to susan. >> she's tireless, a powerhouse. she's absolutely something you want to have on your side of the
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table when you're trying to put some sort of real estate deal together. >> he owns three restaurants and in the process of revital liesing this apartment building, which was slated for demolition. mid town is pushing ahead. susan has been the catalyst and her work here isn't done. >> 26 is the number of new businesses will open within the year. commercial real estate taxes produce over 50% of much-needed revenue for the city. that's what's good for business and can be good for detroit. aljazeera, detroit. >> good to see that there's some money flowing into detroit. >> once again, thety has a new mayor with a tough road ahead of him trying to turn the city around, trying to change the blight. we wish that city the best. >> coming up at the end of our first hour, here's what we're
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following. the huge typhoon is slamming the philippines with 195 miles an hour gusts. winds are covering 500 miles. >> secretary of state john kerry is heading to geneva to join the nuclear negotiations with iran, but israel is clamming any deal, saying it won't be bound by the agreement. >> president obama has apologized to americans who lost their current health insurance after repeatedly promising that would not happen. aljazeera continues. we are back in two and a half minutes with del walters. >> we leave you with a live look here at new york city. have a great morning.
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>> al jazeera america is the
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only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america. >> nature unleashes devastation in the philippines, a massive typhoon, one of the most powerful storms ever, forcing millions to take shelter or flee. >> a deal to halt ires nuclear program could be close. in a surprise move, secretary of state john kerry headed to geneva. >> so iran got the deal of the century and the international community got a bad deal. this is a very bad deal. >> this angry reaction from israeli prime minister netanyahu rejecting any deal with iran. >> we'll show you entrepreneurs tapping into the power of 3-d
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printers. >> it is one of the most powerful storms ever recorded and 12 million people in the philippines are in its path. super typhoon haiyan has been battering the pacific islands for hours, the storm hitting the sustained winds of 135 miles an hour, and gusting near 235 miles an hour. the typhoon now has the strength of a cat five hurricane and is causing catastrophic damage. it's already killed four people and that number expected to rise. good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. now to get an idea of the size of this typhoon, it is more than 500 miles wide. that is roughly the distance between new york city and charlotte, north carolina. the storm couldn't have come at a worse tile.
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hundred was thousands of filipinos losing their homes just a few weeks ago in a powerful earthquake. the forecasters say the storm won't hit the capitol city of manila. it has since weakened. for the latest, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> still a potent storm with winds which were estimated at landfall at 195 miles per hour are now 165 miles per hour. still what we would consider in the beyond a category five storm. of course in this part of the world, it's called a super typhoon. the dimester in terms of those winds, hurricane force winds extending out 100 miles, tropical storm force winds extending out 250 miles from the center. this could go down as one of the most potent storms on record, because right as it was making landfall, estimated 195-mile per hour winds, well in the united states, we actually send planes into these to record that. in this part of the world, it's satellite estimates, so we don't
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actually have a specific recording of this, so go back of a the fact and see what damage was done. but if we look at the two storms in recent history that have hit the united states as a category five, that's a very rare event. you're talking hurricane andrew in the 1990's and hurricane camille, which was back in 1969. those storms raise buildings right to the ground. this welled up water expected at 20 feet. the reason we haven't heard of loss of life or damage yet is these islands are now cut off. we'll go back in after the fact and check all of that damage out. if it is determined that this really hit at 195 miles an hour, camille's currently sets the report at 190 miles per hour for a land falling wind category, so this would set the record, if we are able to verify that. there weren't aircraft measurements, we'll have to go in other ways to measure this. this is continuing to track
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across the islands right now and it's going to reemerge. in two days from now, another strike into vietnam, right now is expected a the that strength what we call a category two hurricane. it's going to stay a very potent typhoon as it continues its way along. del. >> thank you very much. we want to go live now to craig in hong kong. this is already a killer typhoon. >> that's correct. it's caused immeasurable damag. we are still getting reports to gauge what it has done. communication in many parts of the villages have been cut. we lost communications with our own correspondent there. the weather bureau has lost communication with its local station. what we do know is that four people have died, two electrocuted, one hit by a
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falling tree, another struck by lightning. 27,000 people have been moved from their homes, and a couple of the islands on the eastern seaboard where this first made landfall was completely devastated. the pictures we're getting coming through now show that day was literally turned into night as the storm drove across the island, one part with 1 million people across the island. he expect to hear reports tomorrow of extreme damage to the philippines. >> as we indicated, this couldn't have come at a worse possible time, a lot of filipinos just getting over the earthquake three weeks ago. that is only going to add to the damage estimates. >> that's correct, a double whammy. that earthquake killed more than
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100 people, flattened village in the islands we were just talking about. many tent cities were erected to shelter people while these areas were rebuilt. they are definitely not able to shelter people during a typhoon. those people had to be moved once again from their homes and relocated. the philippines is a very storm-ridden country that had 24 typhoons this year. we are able to evacuate people ahead of them. >> craig by phone from hong kong. thank you very much, and as always, stay safe. >> this storm as you heard nicole say could go down in hill as one of the strongest ever to make landfall. it is more powerful than a category five storm in the atlantic and in tornadoes would
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be an ef5. in the last 50 years, only three storms have approached the level of destruction. hurricane camille slammed mississippi with winds of 190 miles an hour. ten years later, typhoon tip ravaged japan triggering mud slides and hundreds were killed. the next year, hurricane alan ripping through the gulf of mexico caused $3 billion in damage. hurricane katrina did not make the list. >> americans coping with mental health issues and addiction are going to be able to get more health insurance coverage soon. the obama administration is now working on standards that will require insurers to cover mental health. officials say the new rules will insure mental health benefits are just as generous as those for medical and surgical treatments. insurers say streets are sometimes lengthy. premiums won't be increased, because only certain number of
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patients require higher levels of care. health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is expected to speak about those standards in just about 20 minutes. >> i'm sorry, the words to the president to americans losing their health insurance plans. president obama repeatedly promised that no one would have to give up their policies if they liked them, but millions of americans are getting cancellation notices in the mail. those plans are being canceled because they didn't meet the new federal standards. >> i am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me. we've got to work hard to make sure that they know we hear them and that we're going to do everything we can to deal with folks who find themselves in a tough position as a consist jeans two members of the senate now introducing a bill delaying parts of health care allow. democratic joe man and mark kirk want to push back the deadline for insurance enrollment.
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that's when the uninsured must sign up for policies or face penalties. their bill would push it back one year. >> secretary of state john kerry is arriving in geneva to join nuclear talks with iran. they ended thursday. iran's foreign minute stern said a deal could be reached today. iran wants relief from the economic sanctions that are crushing its economy and return those six participating nations are asking iran to pull back on its nuclear program. president obama says he's not ready to eliminate international sanctions, though, against iran. >> our job is not to trust iranians, our job is to put in place mechanisms where we can verify what they're doing, and not doing when it comes to their nuclear program and the negotiations taking place are not about easing sanctions. the negotiations taking place are about how iran begins to meet its international
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obligations. >> aljazeera's phil ittner is in switzerland. iran's foreign minister says a deal is in the works and secretary kerry is expected. are we to believe something could happen as early as today. >> well, del, certainly there are an awful lot of big players coming into town, not just secretary kerry, but the foreign ministers of britain, france and germany are coming here, so something in afoot. an awful lot of these people are cautious, saying there are are still differences to be hashed out, but what exactly those differences are, what is being floated in any kind of deal, it's not 100% clear yet. there are certain elements like whether or not the eye raines will decrease their enrichment prom of uranium, a toppen the centrifuges they use, more transparency. for the west, will they
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alleviate the sanctions that are crippling the economy in iran. there's an awful lot of variables here, an awful lot of work being done behind closed doors. the fact that these big heavy hitters is coming to town is contributing to a sense of cautious opt muscle in geneva. >> there are those hard-liners. i want you to listen to what prime minister benjamin naten yahoo had to say. >> they got everything and paid nothing. everything they wanted. they wanted relief of sanctions after years of grueling sanctions regime. they got that. they're paying nothing, because they're not reducing in any way they're nuclear enrichment capability, so iran got the deal of the century. >> so i guess the question that has to be asked is will this deal come at the expense of israel? >> well, dell, there's an awful
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lot of skepticism and bad blood when it comes to iran and there are hard-liners everywhere. in the states, we heard a resumed call for not less sanctions, but more, because it is thought that is what brought iranians to the table here. delegations on hand think that would be a veried about idea. would poison the well. now there are also hard-liners obviously in tehran to be dealt with. we're looking at decades of conflict here and skepticism and bad blood that will be needed to be overcome, but the delegation here says this is of utmost importance and that the alternative of not finding some sort of negotiated settlement would be far worse than what is proposed, and that anything that is signed here would be reversible within about a six month period. we'll to have wait and see what they're working on, whether or not there actually is something that is proposed to be signed, but again, certainly an awful
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lot of activity here in switzerland. >> thank you very much, phil. >> palestinian leaders are saying there is no doubt yasser arafat was murdered, mirroring the findings of an aljazeera investigation. palestinians say israel is the one and only suspect. hours ago, results were released from two tests on arafat's remains. they say a report from switzerland show he was poisoned, although the second report from russia isn't at clear. they still say foul play was involved in arafat's death and they're now stepping up calls for an international investigation. aljazeera has more from ramallah. >> palestinian officials say they will continue their investigations and that the case of the death of arafat will remain open and will not be closed until they arrive at the full facts and the details and the truth to share with the palestinian people who require answers and closure and as well
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with the international community. palestinian officials have already blamed israel squarely for poisoning and killing arafat. they say at the time, the israelis were the only ones with the means, the cutting edge technology and motive to kill arafat, and they say were probably able to facilitate the entry of such a rare substance into the compound where arafat was under siege. back in 2004, the israeli army was totally surrounding and besiege be the presidential compound, the headquarters in ramallah and were in control of what and who could go in and out of the compound. where they go next, the palestinians, is a decision that has to be made at the highest political levels. as you know, palatine is a non-member state at the united nations, and does have the right to apply for membership at the
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international criminal court at the hague. however the palestinians have promised the united states to put this move off until they give negotiations a chance. now, right now, the palestinians and israelis are engaged in a nine month period of negotiations, which ends next april. some palestinian officials have said that carrying on and continuing these negotiations after these findings have been revealed would be improper. >> that was aljazeera in ramallah. >> still ahead, elite american soldiers accused of heinous war crimes. we'll talk to the rolling stone reporter who uncovered the story of u.s. special forces allegedly torturing and killing civilians during the war in afghanistan. >> the f.d.a. declaring war on transfats and why some americans aren't happy about it and telling the government to stay out of their snacks. >> whether by necessity or choice, more seen years are working long after the usual
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retirement age. what's behind this aging of the workforce. >> we want to show you lady liberty right now in new york. and to contact the centers and
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. we're going to tell you about american green berets, and talk to the rolling stone reporter that they may have tortured and killed civilians in afghanistan. first we want to check your weather across the nation. we turn to nicole mitchell. >> good morning. yes, we've had temperatures go down from yesterday. some of our crisp spots this morning, minneapolis, 27 degrees into the northeast, temperatures in the 50's and 60's yesterday are now more in the 40's. i hope you're you ok with these temperatures, as a preview, these low temperatures we're seeing now are going to be what are highs are going to be early next week in the midwest, they won't get out of the 20s in some cases and in the northeast is in
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the 40's this morning might see those at highs next week. you're going to have to get out the extra layers. the one warm spot, midsection of the country with a warm flow, denver at 68, usually in the mid-60's, so you're enjoying this weather here. >> an international team are inspecting and eliminating syria's chemical stockpiles. they've used cameras to survey the area they couldn't get to, thought to be too dangerous to visit. 21 sites have been neutralized. the u.s. says there is new intelligence saying declarations may not have been complete. >> the new chief of the pakistani taliban plans to attack the government, vowing revenge for the killing of his predecessor by an american zone.
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that new chief is known for burning public schools and beheadings in tribal areas. >> there is a new report out raising serious charges about an elite special forces unit known as the a team. the report claims they tortured and killed 18 afghan civilians during the afghanistan war. an investigation is called for. the new details are emerging in the article in "rolling stone" called the 18 killings, written by matthew akins. thank you for being with us this morning. these are very serious accusations, murder and torture. what are the facts that back this up? >> the central facts of the case are that these bodies are found outside of the base after the special forces unit was forced out of the province early this year in response to complaints of the locals. eventually, the afghan government forced them to leave. that's what they started finding bodies buried outside of the
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base. >> your investigation into the allegations, be take a look at it. this is not a member of the alpha team, but clearly what you are talking about. tell us exactly what we are looking at. >> obviously we're not looking at anything right now, so -- >> but i want to ask you the evidence, was it overwhelming. ok, we have it how to. let's take a look. what is this video of? >> this video shows what appears to be afghan being whipped by afghan soldiers and translators, what he is appears to be american forces personnel looking on. it's really disturbing look at what's unfortunately very common in afghan detention facilities, this kind of torture under interrogation. >> every war dating back to world war i has seen these allegation, but they come out much later. we have to wait for did he classified documents. now we live in instantaneous
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times where every helmet, every tank has a camera. is this war different or is the military now being held to a higher level of accountability? >> i don't think the military is being held to a higher level of accountability. i think that these kinds of incidents are often unreported and even when reported, are not thoroughly investigated. for example, even though i spent five months investigating this story and the military supposedly has an on going criminal investigation, i never spoke with anyone who melt with the military investigators looking into these very serious allegations of war crimes. >> what does the military say? >> consistently denied the killings even afterred bodies came out of the ground and reports corroborated the investigations. they did open an investigation with the red cross. it's unclear whether that is going to be a serious investigation. >> are you done now or does your investigation continue?
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>> i think right now, the investigation's in the hands of the military and the afghan government, if they are going to hold the individuals responsible for killing these people accountable or not. >> by holding them accountable, what do you want? what should happen, in your opinion? >> it's not what i want, but what the families want, the fact of these men being killed, demands is transparent and fully resourced investigation that holds people criminally responsible for their actions. >> thank you very much for being with us this morning. >> pleasure. >> a journalist based out of kabul, afghanistan. >> fighting between rival factions in libyas capitol has now injured up to 10 people. these clark in tripoli after a militia cheap was killed. a raddison hotel where diplomats and business travelers often stay was hit.
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there are smaller militias, some accused of plunging libya into deeper instability. the country by wait still has no constitution. >> muslim workers who were fired at d.h.l. in kentucky are filing a complaint with the federal government, saying supervisors revoked a break time policy that gave them time for their evening prayers. those prayers take about five minutes. 24 workers were fired last month, saying that coworkers who are not muslims were given non-scheduled breaks just to smoke a cigarette. federal civil rights law call for accommodations to follow religious obligations. >> president obama is scheduled to travel to louisiana to talk about growing exports in the u.s. it is a major turnaround for are that state and beyond. we have more from louisiana. >> the southern bend of the mississippi river twists from baton rouge to new orleans.
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the gulf of mexico and the world. >> this is the super interstate of waterways. >> big barge carry commodities that feed the world and oil and gas that powers it. america's cheap energy product costs are about to flow down the river and drive and economic bonanza and surge of jobs. >> a natural economic growth. what you have here is something that just has not been witnessed in the united states. this is, you've got 80 to $100 billion over the next five to 10 years in major investments. >> this is the largest to knowage port in the entire western hemisphere, the port of south louisiana. as the construction boom goes here, state and local officials say that it will create tens of thousands of jobs over the coming decades and bring in revenue like the state has never seen before. >> how much will niece new jobs pay? >> yea $3,000, and with overtime, you may look at
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$120,000 a year. >> wow. >> roy runs this port. he says the main reason for the expansion historically low natural gas prices, that the world wants now. with that, comes a huge discount. >> because of the new and innovative way of tapping the natural gas reserves that we have running abundantly here in louisiana, the true fracturing. >> the worlds producer of fertilizer, plastics and pharmaceuticals wants in. >> we have companies from south africa to new zealand, to german all coming into louisiana. >> with expansion of this size, there is caution. can the state attract enough skilled workers and how safe is the development in a fragile ecosystem? >> we do need to have our eye on the environmental side of this and make sure that side is well protected, as well and not do things in a cavalier manner. >> but in a state where energy
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is king, money talks. >> major dollars, billions of dollars to develop and enhance and further expand their industrial facilities. >> energy has always driven boom and bust cycles here. at issue will be the price socially, politically and environmentally where the good times roll. robert ray, aljazeera, reserve, louisiana. >> louisiana's exports rose 3.5% this year compared to oh the same period in 2012. that is worth about $29 billion. >> still ahead, the october jobs report is out any minute now. we'll explain what the numbers mean and why some say these figures this time are going to be distorted. >> the federal government is banning transfats. we'll tell you what foods will be most affected by the change. >> 3-d printers are moving beyond plastic. an expo where it is put to the
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test on a very big scale. >> i'm john henry smith. it was glitz versus grit, highlights from north cal ahead in sports. the immediate response is, "they're here to take my kids". >> from the indian perspective who sees this in terms of history, this is as about as adversarial as it gets.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story.
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>> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. these are our top stairs at this hour. one of the strongest storms ever recorded is pound i can the philippines. more than 100,000 people had to be evacuated ahead of super typhoon haiyan, that storm packing sustained winds of 195 miles an hour. that is more powerful than a category five hurricane. >> palestinian officials blame israel for the death of yasser arafat. it comes one day after an aljazeera investigation that found the palestinian leader may have been murdered with a deadly radioactive poison.
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the head of the palestinian committee investigating the death calls it an as nation. >> a breakthrough deal on iran's nuclear program appears to be in the works. secretary of state john kerry has decided to join the talks in geneva, expected to meet with the iranian foreign minister there. both leaders will make a joint statement on a deal. >> the mayo clinic calls transfats double trouble for the heart. the u.s. government declared thursday they are going to be a thing of the past. here's something about transfats you probably don't know. it's produced when hydrogen is added to vegetable oil and helps maintain food freshness and texture. doctors found they also raise the bad cholesterol levels and lower the good levels, leading to clogged arteries and health disease. several cities have restricted their use and now the f.d.a. is phasing them out across the count withy. as aljazeera reports, this will have a huge impact on the traditional way we eat.
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>> americans prepare to say goodbye to all this. it might prove tasty, but the f.d.a. declared transfat an artery clogging per i will and taken the first steps to ban it. >> it's so unhealthy. i'm so glad they're doing it. it's in snacks, like cookies. >> many americans can't say what a france fat is. >> i know they're not good for you, but i don't know what they are. >> i don't know. >> no, i do not. what is it? >> the agency says banning the substance found in cooking oil and processed foods could prevent 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths each year in the u.s. >> transfats are the worst in our food supply, not only raising the bod cholesterol, but lowering the good cholesterol. >> it adorn the labels of a broad array of processed food from margarine to chocolate cake, in fact everything on this counter. here in chicago, it can even be
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found in this signature meal, deep dish pizza. >> here in illinois, a proposal to ban the substance failed two years ago, but americans are eating 80% less than a decade ago anyway in part due to local bans in places like new york and california. some u.s. fast food chains including mcdonald's and pop eyes chicken still serve it. for more, personal liberty is more important than health, even if they can't quite define what it is they want. >> i just know it's bad, but i'm not for banning it. i want to have my own choice. >> it might require a change in american's hearty appetites, but once the ban is phased in, authorities hope prevention will avert the need for a measure of cardiac cure. aljazeera, chicago. >> there is breaking news coming in on the economic front. the labor department has just released the october jobs report.
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aljazeera's patricia joins us now with the numbers. they are different than what people expected. >> the numbers are different from what many expected. the economy added 204,000 non-farm payroll jobs in october. the unemployment rate was at 7.3%, that would be holding steady from the month before and labor force participation rate, bear in mind this is the number of people in work and the people who are also actively looking for work, the labor force participation rate appears to have edged down slightly, but all of these numbers, del, come with a huge caveat, that being the government shutdown. for one thing, you have furloughed workers affecting the overall jobs creation numbers and the unemployment numbers. also, you have to bear in mind, that the data collection was also interfered with. this data is not as reliable as data we've had in the past. you should really take all of these numbers with a grain of
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salt. >> wouldn't we expect a down tick in the numbers with government shut down and so many workers furloughed? >> many did expect a down tick. we're going into the holiday shopping season, so retailers will add more part time workers, as well. we can sit and speculate about why this number came in in a different way, but the oversaul take away of this is they are simply not as reliable as other numbers. >> we are no the done, with the speculation. let's turn to brian levitt, a senior economist at oppenheimer funds. what's your take on these job numbers? >> it's stronger than we expected. it's not all that different than what we've seen over the last couple of years. it's still consistent with a very non-inflationary lackluster expansion in the united states. of a country of 315, 320 million americans, we sit and try to dissect whether we added 150,000
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jobs, 200,000 jobs, what estimates are made to determine those numbers. it's still a weak job number for a country this size and so far along from a recession. you are looking at almost five years since the official end of the recession, and we're still only adding between 152,200,000 jobs a month. that's a pretty weak outcome. >> you have to look at the labor force participation rate which edged down slightly. this is the crucial number. when you see the unemployment rate, if it goes down, if it goes up, it's really the labor force participation rate. when you see that going down, what it signals is that people are getting discouraged and dropping out of the labor force and that's a very, very bad signal. >> if anything emerged during the government shut down is that government is a major factor in the employment situation. some say it is to blame for the numbers either rising or falling. do you share that vision? >> we've seen this for a couple
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of years. whether you want to place blame on the federal government or on the crisis in europe, or other things that are happening around the world, it's really just a notion of uncertainty with rewards to business leaders. if you think about going into 2011 or 2012, if you surveyed businesses and asked what do they intend to do with all that cash on the balance sheets, increasingly you heard well, our productivity is falling, global demand picking up, we need to invest more people, more in capital equipment. you've seen it with fits and starts, the beginning of 2011 and 2011 were good, you've seen reports in a given month here in 2013, but the reality is you run smack into things like the european debt crisis, the government shutdown, the fiscal cliff, the elections in the united states and it creates more uncertainty for business leaders. we're at a point where businesses likely need to add workers. when you're productivity is zero and demand is picking up, you
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need more workers, but there remains a general caution about doing so. >> thanks both of you for joining us. there is breaking news on the health care front. had is health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. >> together in the 1970's and then my father had the honor of serve i go as the head of the agency for international development when jimmy carter was president. we go back a long way. mrs. carter and my mother were friends, so it feels like back in the family that i'm able to be here. there's no question that rosalyn carter has been an incredible leader in the mental health arena. for more than a generation. >> the reason we are going live in atlanta right now is because we are anticipating that she will announce changes in the
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health care program, so that is why we are taking this event live. let's listen a little bit more. of course right now, she is recognizing those gathered. she is at the carter center for the center for former president jimmy carter. >> with us today, certainly his father was a significant leader and champion in this effort. i couldn't be happier to be here at the carter center in atlanta. anywhere out of washington these days is a good place to be. certainly here is a really good place to be. [ laughter ] >> you know, in atlanta, you have to think a little bit about some of the great musical roots and ray charles famously sang about georgia on my mind. for nearly three decades, this symposium here at the carter center has been georgia for the
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mind. year after year, the road to progress leads back to you. madam first lady, if i could, i wanted to share a few of the words you wrote back in 2003, because here a decade later, i think they still resonate. mrs. carter said we know so much more today and yet the problems are still very much the same, with one exception, recovery. 25 years ago, we didn't dream that people might someday actually be able to recover from mental illness, and today, it's a real possibility. now, that hasn't happened on that its own. we've gotten here today, because so many of you who are here at this symposium worked and advocated so hard for so many years, but i this i all of us can agree that our work is not done. i know i'm not alone in this room to say that this issue is
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personal. in the last six months, i've actually had two of my family members experience crises, and both of them were able to receive help and support because they had resources and family and friends to turn to. in either case, it wasn't easy, and the handoff from crisis, stabilization to community support was rocky at best. the coordination really wasn't coordinated, and i run the department of health and human services. i know what assistance is out there, i know where the networks are, i have an amazing array of caring experts to give me great advice, so i know, having walked through that experience myself how difficult this is for way too many families, but the personal toll for families and individuals is beyond their experience. this is a personal toll that we take on as a country, to help
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people achieve the promise of recovery. now, here's a snapshot many of you know well. nine in 10 americans with one stance abuse disorders don't receive the care they need. 60% of americans with a mental health condition don't receive the care they need. that's the snapshot of 2013 in america. there's no question we need to expand access to treatment, services and support. in this vein, it's my great pleasure to share some big news with you today, news that i know many of you have been anxiously awaiting. later this morning, we will post the final parity rule for mental health. [ applause ]
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>> now that incredibly important law, combined with the affordable care act will expand and protect behavioral health benefits for more than 62 million americans, people who either have insurance coverage now and have no mental health coverage and the affordable care act now fills in those gaps, or people who have no insurance at all and will eventually be able to access affordable care with mental health and substance abuse benefits. this is the largest expansion of behavioral health coverage in a generation. it's thanks to the efforts of -- >> you're listening now to health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius making a major announcement, major changes in the health care laws concerning the coverage of mental health. just two weeks ago, canning man patrick kennedy saying that it is time the nation not only cover the body, but the mind and the rest of the head.
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major changes coming out of atlanta from the carter center from health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. >> while many americans say they noon retire by the age of 65, there are a lot of older americans who are still in the workforce. in fact, this summer, seen years occupied a larger share of the job force than ever before. aljazeera's tom ackermann has more from washington. >> in this pack of marathon bicyclists, gail fleming stands out. a few months ago, she turned 65, but isn't slowing down. biking is just one way to spend her free time when she's not making a living as a full time real estate broker. gail said she doesn't know when she'll stop working. >> i never actually thought about retirement, because it just seemed like it just wasn't anything in my consciousness. >> the rocky u.s. housing economy has made working longer a dollars and cents necessity for her. >> pretty much everything i
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saved, i lost. it wasn't a huge amount, but it was, you know, fairly substantial. i'm kind of at square one at this point. >> gail is part of what economists view as one of the biggest changes in the u.s. job economy. the surge of seen years in the workforce. during this decade, government projections see a 12% drop in the number of workers age 16-24, barely any increase among those 25-54, while workers aged 55 and up will grow by 38%. one factor keeping them on the job, a smaller share of americans expected to draw guaranteed pensions from their employers, but that's not the only financial consideration. there's an important incentive for seen years to work past retirement age of 66. social security allows you to draw a paycheck and still collect your full retirement benefits. >> younger workers may think they're getting the short end of
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the stick in this equation but should be encouraged by this. >> as people work longer, the rest of society doesn't have to support them so long in retirement. while they're working, they're paying taxes. >> gail has just begun to plan for life out of the workplace, but not until she turns 70. >> seniors say they're not only staying on the job longer, but happy to do so. there's a study out finding nine in 10 workers 50 or older say they are very or somewhat satisfied with their jobs. >> to sports now, a couple of big matchups in the b.c.s. last night. >> the big matchup was on the west coast. an undefeated record, check. glitzy uniforms, double check. oregon seemed to have it all
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stanford. first quarter, no score. up the middle for six. carried 45 times and only lost yardage on one carry. john elway liking what he sees. second quarter, quarterbacks are doing it for themselves. hogan up the middle, 11 yards, touchdown, stanford up early. afterred failed on-side kick, oregon eats it up, picks it up and 65 yards for six. we got ourselves a ballgame. 26-13 after the failed two-point try. with over two minutes left to play, moving and throwing to brown for the 12-yard score. oregon's rally would fall short. stanford hangs on 26-20.
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>> oklahoma, baylor on the one. just like that, bears take a 12-point lead. final minute of the half, oklahoma looking to answer, but blake bell gets picked off by eddie lackey, and that would be most costly. on the ensuing drive, petty looking for a good man and he finds antoine for a 25-yard touchdown. it's only the second win in 24 meetings. >> another day, another chapters in the scandal. a statement saying jonathan endured harassment that went far beyond the traditional locker room hazing, saying beyond the well publicized voice mail, he endured a physical attack on him by a teammate and daily vulgar
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comments. also on thursday, martin's agent rick smith said his client suffered abuse from multiple dolphins, not just incognito. a florida woman filed a police report against incognito in may for physically abuse i can her on a golf course. >> nfl action thursday night, vikings hosting the redskins, second quarter, washington trailing by four. robert griffin, iii. it's 27-14 skins. vikings have the ball. carlson sneaks it into the end zone. minnesota within seven. still in the third, same score. rolls to his left. up to this point, he was having his best game maybe as a pro. he decides to hook it to the end zone. comes up in obvious pain. ponder dislocates his left non-throwing shoulder.
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the vikings score on the next play to take the lead. 37 seconds left in the game, washington's got a chance. going for it on fourth down griffin to moss, he makes the catch but can't keep both feet in grounds. the vikings hold on to win. >> you know i'm not smiling. >> i see you're not smiling. >> redskins lost. >> there's always next week. >> the uses for lead to printers expand each and every day from building houses to other uses, we take a look. >> i'll take a look at your forecast coming up.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. in just a few seconds, we're going to look at amazing flew lead to printer technology and how some pretty smart people are harnessing those powers in i in
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genius ways. >> we are going to see this inquire into the northwest starting to spread rain into the northern plains. a lot of wind with this system as its moved across, so higher elevations in parts of the rockies, for example, you could be getting six inches or more of snow. those are why the winter weather advisories. high winds gusting 40-60, so you know, snow and wind is going to make driving treacherous. the one other area with enough of a flow across the great lakes, watch for isolated moisture near that. we will update you throughout the day about the super typhoon, but we're just starting to get more images in. as this hits, some storm surge was estimated at 20 feet, that's three people high. you can see people trying to get back in from the water, but of course, a lot of these islands,
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as the form hit, are equivalent of a category five were cut off from communication. that's why we haven't heard the extend of the damage yet. >> it is probably the sure sign that the holiday season is kicking into high gear at least in new york. the 76-foot tall christmas tree that is going to stand in rockefeller plaza has arrived. neck month, it will be lit with 45,000led lights. it was hauled in from connecticut. it will be lit on december 4 and remain on display until january 7. that event started back in 1931. >> we're going to find you the in a month whether the washington monument is shrinking. surveyors are checking the height of the structure. it's been under repair since a rare earthquake. the monument may have settled slightly. surveyors will get an accurate read. it's listed as the tallest
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structure in the nation's capitol, supposed to be 555 feet and 1/8 inches tall. >> 3-d printing is making waves in construction and medicine. we have more. >> hello. >> this is a robot controlled by voice command built almost entirely with a lead to printer. >> it has been downloaded 89,000 times. >> lead to printing is the process of building an object from the ground up, adding material layer by layer. it is popular with architects abjewelers and product designers. >> we send a prototype out and getting it back seven days later, they can create it using one of our printers. >> the possibility of using lead to printers is explored in an increase in number of
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industries. enough parts ca can be built to build and entire house. >> there is now scanning technology which can scan houses, cars, even people. >> plastic prototypes are just the beginning. this man is printing with human embryonic stem cells. >> the first cell was an embryonic stem cell. this contains all the genetic information that makes you you. >> this could see the end of animal testing and pave the way for humor begans to be printed. >> if you can create micro tissues, then there's not much stopping you from just making enough micro tissues to make an
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organ. >> with advances in the technology, organs won'tti soon. perhaps within the next 50 years, a welcome use of 3-d printing being used across the world. aljazeera, london. >> there's nothing like a classic taking place in the national hall of fame. the rubber duck inducted thursday, lots of ducks were there for the competition. it was stiff. the duck beaten other finalists, including bubbles and those little green army men. aljazeera continues in just two and a half minutes. i'll see you then.
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determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that
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are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> tonight on al jazeera america change the way you look at news tune into live news at 8 and 11 >> i'm john seigenthaler and here's a look at the headlines.. >> infomation changes by the hour here... >> our team of award winning journalists brings you up to the minute coverage of today's events... then, at 9 and midnight. america tonight goes deeper with groundbreaking investigative coverage of the nation's top stories... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern followed by america tonight on al jazeera america there's more to it.
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